Stars among Hexagons

Model
…/2j48rCQ …/2j5Nqtx …/2j57EHD …/2j9mnup …/CBGVqDlpnGr/ …/2j78FCM …/CAcEXKXJVq3/ …/CApA6B1Jc4x/ …/CAkbSaLp6Mx/ …/CA0RI4xJrN1/ …/1638824566283385 …/1636102696555572 …/1640312199467955 …/1650362538462921 …/1643879922444516 …/1263344164328157188 …/1265166167393677318 …/1264520462404591616 …/1269293215049486343 …/1266749918678564866
No folding instructions for this model are listed on my page.
Related posts: Paper Review: John Gerard’s Hemp and Flax Paper
This is the primary page for this model.
Paper: Hand-Made Paper (John Gerard’s hemp and flax paper)
Type: classic tessellation, tessellated stars (implies: abstract, geometric, pattern, star, symbol, abstract periodic tessellation, non-recursive periodic tessellation, periodic tessellation, tessellation)
Author: Michał Kosmulski, Unravelling Pattern (Hana Blaskova) (independent discovery)
Colors: brown and beige
In albums: Models designed by me and by others, Models with back-lit pictures, Showcase

Front Close-up Back Angled view In back-light
Images are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

This origami tessellation is based on a geometric pattern I spotted on a door in the Barcelona Cathedral during my trip back from CfC 2 convention. A design like this is also often found in islamic art (usually in the form of interwoven lines rather than filled areas) and since this origami version is a rather simple design, I wouldn’t be surprised if it had already been made by someone else before [update: Unravelling Pattern published the same pattern while I was working on mine].

The back side of a single molecule resembles a flower, but since the flowers overlap this is not so obvious in the complete model. There are some pleats on the back side of the model which I could flatten and make the back-lit view of the individual light areas of the tessellation more symmetric, but this would make the back side look worse in normal conditions (reflected light).

Folded from hemp and flax paper hand made by John Gerard, which I reviewed in a separate blog post.

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